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ASID HI-POWER RADIO GIGABYTES
Sunday, 7 August 2005
Welcome to our Carnival Celebration Podcast
Mood:  celebratory
Topic: Carnival Updates
Welcome to our Carnival Celebration Podcast - 74 Minutes of "Carnival"

WELCOME !!! We're celebrating Carnival with Mark Rankin of Top Secret MM Studios; and the Birmingham Carnival Crew, on August 07, 2005 in Birmingham England. as well we share with you info on the Detroit MI Carnival Weekend - Aug 12-14, 2005. Reggae Artist/DJ and Host of the Reggae Soundblast - O.C Roberts shares with us his search for a new venue to host the Reggae Soundblast and it's "Live Broadcasts". This Podcast will be Part One in a multi part series on Carnival Celebrations 2005 - so stay tuned for updates. We're expecting a tape from Mark Rankin of the Birmingham/Handsworth Carnival Festivities; and as well we'll post our Detroit Carnival Festivities Pod Update during the week of August 15th, 2005.

the Birmingham Carnival will be on August 07, 2005 in Birmingham England. Carnival hotline number:011 - 0121 303 1991 - any questions about the event, or having a stall: for more info see the getting involved in Birmingham Carnival page. Carnival has a new Queen! - in an exciting competition on Friday night seven beautiful women competed for the title of Birmingham Carival Queen: and the winner was Shantel Ogarro. See the Carnival Queen page for more! The Carnival Procession starts at 12.30 from Oxhill Road, Handsworth and ends up at Perry Park at approx 3.30: then the party lasts until 9.00pm.

photos courtesy of author: James Robertson, Birmingham Carnival webmaster.


Posted by asid-hi-power at 7:21 PM EDT
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Wednesday, 3 August 2005
PODCAST: Junior
Mood:  celebratory
Topic: Todays Roots Music News
Musical Podcasts
Roots Podcasts
Interviews
Affiliates
HipHop & News Podcasts

RawRootsPodcast Presents "Junior One Blood Reid" - 73 Minutes of Fire

RawRootsPodcast Presents "Junior One Blood Reid" - 73 Minutes of Fire WE invite you to enjoy our Visit with Junior Reid and His Brother/Tour Manager Chris, when they stopped by recently for a chat with Mama Asid - after the Show at Detroits' TrenchTown on 07/31/05. Junior Reveals the whole story on the Great Train/Track Robbery by Toshiba - and the other companies, who refuse to pay artist royalties and release product.. and he shares with us details on his Career, the Studio Runnins and then you can enjoy the moment that we get his instant reaction to the digital print of "Worries In the Dance".. delivered to him fresh from Top Secret MM Studios - by non other than Mama Asid..,, Junior agrees with Mama that this tune is a "Massive 5 Alarm Hit".. you can download this Podcast to your MP3 Player
Who Is Junior "One Blood" Reid Who Is Junior "One Blood" Reid..

A namesake of his father, Kingston, Jamaica- born singer Delroy "Junior" Reid is part of a group of singers whose cutting edge style challenges musical boundaries and springs from the politically- turbulent era of the 1970's. From the early age of 14, with his first single "Know Myself" which he recorded for fellow artist Hugh Mundell's label, Junior proved his gift in the marketplace. A native of the Waterhouse section of Kingston, he formed his first band called Voice of Progress who had a hit in Jamaica with the song "Minibus Driver" and released an album by the same name. What followed was a prolific recording period that produced a number of singles for King Jammys including the hit "Boom Shacka Lacka." "Foreign Mind" was recorded with Sugar Minott's Youth Promotion as well as his own JR Production label- two artist owned companies which are a vital part of the massive 45 singles market that exists in Jamaica to the present day. When he was 18 years old he was asked to replace the spot filled by Michael Rose in Black Uhuru. This period resulted in a wellspring of great compositions including "Fit We Haffi Fit", and the classic collaboration with the 'Riddim Twins'- Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare- "Great Train Robbery." Junior Reid has a gift for collaboration and the ability to present his talents in a manner that reaches an audience beyond that of the grassroots reggae aficionado. In 1987 he teamed up with Coldcut, an early Acid Jazz group on "Stop This Crazy Thing", a theme taken from the animated series The Jetsons, yielding a Top 20 hit on the European pop charts. One year later in Jamaica, Junior recorded the song "One Blood" his first solo project since the break-up of Black Uhuru. The song was a massive hit from the dance halls of Jamaica to New York and the United Kingdom where remixer Paul 'Trouble' Anderson hailed, the two of them creating a mix, released on Big Life/Mercury that became the first "crossover" hit to incorporate the rhythms of modern day dance hall with a message of unification and strength. Junior Reid ONE BLOOD was released world wide in 1990, and the follow-up album LONG ROAD was released in 1991. Both albums were nominated for the Caribbean Music Awards with ONE BLOOD winning the Jamaica Music Industry Award for Best Album, Best Single, Best Song and Most Conscious Lyrics. The All-Music Guide rates Junior Reid's 1991 release LONG ROAD 4 ? stars (out of a possible 5 stars.) This record includes the classic single "Banana Boat Man" that chronicles the hurdles that the artist has overcome to reach the heights of success. Collaborations with Hip-Hop artists have ensued over the years including those with Busta Rhymes and Bounty Killer on "Change Just Like the Weather" and "Dreadful Day" with the Poor Righteous Teachers. The artist has also worked with the likes of Guru, the Wu-Tang Clan and Bobby Digital. The Soup Dragons cover of the Rolling Stones' song "I'm Free" that featured Junior Reid's toasting became the band's groundbreaking hit. Countless collaborations with reggae artists from the brilliant spectrum of styles have included a full-length album with Don Carlos entitled FIRE HOUSE CLASH. In 1992 Junior Reid recorded the album, VISA that contained some key singles from the era including "All Fruits Ripe" and "Friend Enemy", and a team-up with the late Dennis Brown and Gregory Isaacs entitled "It's Not A One Man Thing". Junior Reid has been toured extensively throughout his career to countries including Japan, throughout the Caribbean, Europe, Africa and the United States. Festival appearances in 2002 have included Rebel Salute in St. Elizabeth, Jamaica, Raggamuffins' Bob Marley Days in Los Angeles, France's Montreux Jazz Festival, SummerJam, 2002 in Hanover, Germany and Reggae in the Park in San Francisco. As a producer, his JR Production company and label has worked with a multitude of artists including the Mighty Diamonds, Elephant Man, Luciano, Anthony B and his two sons: Andrew and Wadada Blood. In the year 2000, Junior Reid released EMMANUEL CALLING with an exalted, agile-toned chorus as its title track, the record contains a m?lange of elements including Dancehall, Hip Hop and R&B. The artist incorporates the sound of the Nyabinghi drum, an integral part of Rasta spirituality on several compositions. The musicians including bassie Chris Meredith and drummie Style Scott, and Deadley Headley Bennett on sax flavor 15 tracks of pro musicianship. "Sky Is the Limit" features a duet with German deejay/rapper Absolute Beginner. The fall of 2002 is the time for RASTA GOVERNMENT to make its debut worldwide. In collaboration with his new LA-based promotion team One Nation Family, JR Productions and Nazrite in the UK, the new album is finding its way to the massive around the world. New songs include "Propoganda", "Taliban", and the title track that bring forth the Bobo Ashanti agenda. New mixes of "One Blood" one with Terry Ganzie and a Spanish version with Argentine deejay Fidel make this 19 song release ram jammed with content. For over 20 years, Junior Reid's vibrant stage presence and flawless falsetto have made fans throughout the world. His conscious, insightful lyrics have allowed him to maintain a powerful and significant role as a roots reggae artist and have given him entr?e to the Hip Hop and Pop music scenes.


RawRootsPodcast Presents "Junior One Blood Reid" - 73 Minutes of Fire - listen here, or download to your mp3 player to enjoy whenever
The Jamaica Star :: BITTER 'BLOOD' - Junior Reid lashes out at Sumfest organisers ::
BITTER 'BLOOD' - Junior Reid lashes out at Sumfest organisers - 07/16/2004 FORMER BLACK UHURU member Junior 'One Blood' Reid has beef with the Sumfest Promoters. His grouse comes from his non-appearance on the show for over 10 years now, despite his presence on the local and international scene. Reid returned just this week from a stint in Montreal, Canada, with his sons and the One Blood family, and will soon jet off for a United States tour which ends in September. He told THE WEEKEND STAR that he cannot understand why an artiste of his ranking has not been booked for Reggae Sumfest. "I am disappointed with the Sumfest people them, cause they say they represent cultural artiste, yet they leave off Junior Reid from the lineup for so long," Reid complained. "Reid is a foundation cultural artiste from a long time, who loves to perform for the people dem so I can't understand it." Reid added that he has not performed at that show for 12 years but he is not bitter about it. He noted, however, that he could not help asking questions about the methods used to choose the artistes who get to perform on the show. "I am not against any of the artiste dem who already on the show still, but I feel that Junior Reid is a big enough artiste to be on the show too...I feel that I am current. Put Junior Reid on any show right now and he can close it. I am current and in the youths dem sights...I think it (his omission) is deliberate." Responding to the charge, Sumfest spokesperson Johnny Gourzong denied slighting or targeting Reid. "What I can say to that is that there was nothing deliberate about that (Reid's omission)," Gourzong explained. "We have to put out x number of artistes on all the nights, from young acts to the big ones, and the numbers are tight." "We have the utmost of respect for Mr Reid. In fact, I listen to his music all the time...We would never deliberately slight an artiste like that." As Gourzong outlined, Sumfest organisers have a formula which they use for selecting the artistes who will work on the show each year. "We look at currency, who has strong appeal in the marketplace at the time. Overall we look at the marketability of the artiste. We have no reason to pick an artiste and deliberately leave them out of the show," Gourzong continued, hinting that Reid's luck with the show may change soon. Junior 'One Blood' Reid has been one of the most lasting faces of Roots Rock Reggae music. He surfaced in the group Black Uhuru in 1986 following the departure of Mykal Rose. Four years later he left and began a decorated solo career which took him on tours all over the world. He has also collaborated with several international acts, to produce some memorable hits over the years. Among some of his best are All Fruits Ripe, Banana Boat Man, Listen To The Voices, and the unforgettable One Blood.


RawRootsPodcast Presents "Junior One Blood Reid" - 73 Minutes of Fire - listen here, or download to your mp3 player to enjoy whenever

Posted by asid-hi-power at 12:01 AM EDT
Updated: Sunday, 28 August 2005 3:23 PM EDT
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Saturday, 30 April 2005
The Jamaica Star :: Deceptive advertising plagues shows ::

Deceptive advertising plagues shows




IT HAS BEEN a long-time habit that has been ongoing, where promoters of
stage shows and other events seek to prep up the popularity of their
events, by advertising artistes who are not billed to appear on the
show.

More recently, artistes such as Beenie Man, Bounty Killer, Macka
Diamond, General Trees, Captain Barkey and Wickerman, among others, have
fallen into the net of artistes who are constantly advertised for shows
on which they have no agreement to perform.

Beenie Man, who was advertised to appear on Love Symbol's 50th
Anniversary show, apparently had no such agreement to appear at the
event. Shocking Vibes, the local record company which manages Beenie
Man, issued a release stating that it had no such agreement with Love
Symbol.

The release read: "This serves to inform the public that Beenie Man, the
artiste born Moses Davis will not be engaging in any Jamaican
performances on the 22nd and 23rd of April as he is booked for overseas
appearances on those dates."

Major problem

Solid Agency's Sharon Burke, who is responsible for the booking of
Bounty Killer and other artistes, says this is an ongoing issue that
they have to face, but at the end of the day, even if legal action is
taken, it may not resolve the problem.

"We have that problem all the time, but it's the promoters who will have
to deal with the patrons, not us. We should sue them, but with our
system, we probably wouldn't get anywhere," Burke stated.

Ray Alexander of Khool Booking Agency, which handles bookings for Macka
Diamond, another artiste who is plagued with this problem, says it is a
regular thing and at times it can reflect negatively on the artistes if
patrons are not aware of what is happening.

"The other day when they had a two-day tour in England with Beenie Man,
they had Macka's name being advertised on it. All that happened was that
the promoters called me and asked for a quote, but they didn't get back
to me," Alexander said.

"Even in Jamaica, a nuff show dem put her name on and she knows nothing
about it. And when she doesn't turn up, she becomes a no show. I think
one of the biggest problems is when artistes themselves put on shows,
and when they ask other artistes to pass through, they will say yes, but
the artistes don't really know their schedule," he said.

He further said that Macka is being advertised for a show at Fayors in
Mandeville for this weekend, and it was only last week that she found
out about it. However, Alexander says it will not be possible for Macka
to even think about showing, as she was previously booked for a show in
Miami.

Alexander says he can't really see a solution to the problem, as he
cannot afford to send out a press release every week.

"One of the things that I am doing now is that whenever promoters book
Macka for a show, I ask them to do an advertisement with her," so at
least persons will be sure that she is actually booked for the event, he
said.

One prominent promoter in the business, who refused to have his name
published, said most of the times it is the artistes themselves who are
to be blamed.

"Mi nah guh even seh nutt'n bout dat, cause mi nuh too worry bout dem.
More time man guh straight to di artiste whe a dem fren and dem wi seh
yes, but when it come to di management, dem seh dem nuh know nothing
bout dat. More time a di artiste themselves fi blame," he said.

Another promoter and popular MC Nuffy agrees that it is an issue that
has to be dealt with by both sides. "It is a two-way street, if you seh
guest artiste, it's always not a must that they will be there. If a
artiste not going to be there, mi nah put him pon di poster, but
sometimes the artistes themselves will say put mi pon di poster an is
not a must that dem nah guh haffi guh foreign fi a show," he said.

"I'm not a promoter that advertise artiste that don't turn up, me haffi
know seh dem a guh deh deh before me advertise them, cause it will
reflect badly on you the promoter," he added.

At the end of the day, promoters, artistes and their management team
will need to come to some agreement as to how best they can go about
getting a commitment that will hold firm, and keep all involved parties
happy.

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remote Posted by asid-hi-power at 2:14 AM EDT
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The Jamaica Star :: BANNED! ::
http://www.jamaica-star.com/thestar/20050429/news/news1.html


BANNED!

A GROUP OF local companies which has dubbed itself a Coalition of
Corporate Sponsors has decided that they will not be sponsoring any
entertainment events at which dancehall artistes Beenie Man and Bounty
Killer are slated to perform until further notice.

According to a statement issued by the coalition, the members ? Courts,
Supreme Ventures, Digicel, Red Stripe, Jamaica Tourist Board, Cable and
Wireless and J. Wray and Nephew ? have taken this decision in the wake
of artistes' recent performances at the Jamaica Carnival's Last Hurrah
where profane language was used by Bounty Killer while Beenie Man
incited the audience to use the same.

"What it means is until further notice we will not be sponsoring any
shows with these artistes. So promoters can hold their shows with these
artistes if they would like to, however, they (corporate sponsors) will
not be providing sponsorship support to these shows," Odette Nixon, a
spokesperson for the coalition told THE STAR.

This latest development may also impact the artistes' involvement in a
multimedia advertising campaign being done under Cable and Wireless'
bmobile brand.

No comment

Speaking with THE STAR yesterday, Everald Edwards of the corporate
communications department at Cable and Wireless said the company has not
yet decided if any action will be taken against the artistes with regard
to the advertising campaign. He also could not state when the company
would make a decision about the issue.

Management for both artistes said they would have to further examine the
statements before they make any comment about the issue.

More research needed

"They (Corporate sponsors) did not specify any names, and I need to do a
little more research to fully understand, before I comment, because they
(the artistes) have apologised profusely and the sponsors know where
they are coming from," said Solid Agency's Sharon Burke, the booking
agent for Bounty Killer.

"I would not want to make a comment until I have studied it
comprehensively. There might be conditions and so any statement at this
time would be premature on my part," was the response from Clyde
McKenzie, the director of Shocking Vibes Limited, Beenie Man's local
label.

He also questioned the Corporate Sponsors' decision for taking this
latest stance. "I would also want to know why this stance was taken,
because it would seem extreme to say the least," he said.

According to the statement, the sponsors' decision was in keeping with
their responsibility to stakeholders to ensure that their marketing
reflects their corporate values. The statement also said they had an
even larger responsibility to the public to act within socially
acceptable standards.

The statement listed three principles to which the companies were
committed which include their refusal to sponsor 'acts or events whose
live performances endorse or incite violence, demean or discriminate
against any person, or include the use of indecent or profane language'.

In light of these principles and standards they found the artistes'
behaviour at the Last Hurrah a violation. "The code is based on the
principle that a breach against one sponsor is considered a breach
against all. In light of this, until further notice the coalition
suspends sponsorship of any event or activity, which includes the
offending artistes in live performance," the statement said.

The members of the coalition also sponsor several entertainment events
which take place throughout the year. They include Red Stripe Reggae
Sumfest, Supreme Ventures Jamaica Carnival and East Fest which is
sponsored by J. Wary and Nephew.

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remote Posted by asid-hi-power at 2:13 AM EDT
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Friday, 29 April 2005

Five Questions with Junior Kelly (Part 1)


Junior Kelly - CARLINGTON WILMOT

TODAY THE STAR poses one of five probing questions to our featured artist for April, Junior Kelly.

Q: What do you see as the positives of our music?

A: "The first one is that different avenues start open up now in the music. Once upon a time you either a produce the music or a play an instrument or yu a perform, but now yu have the dub poets a pop up and now yu have people a make a good living from choreography. People who dancing inna the dancehall and who get a name and who a go pon tour. Jah bless him soul the same Bogle and others widen the scope and the business aspect of it that a one of the positives of it, more people a feed from it as opposed to the traditional singing and musicians etc.

The next positive is that yu have dancehall music (don't know who started that term) start open up some avenues within different genres like the hip hop market to name one. People now have their eyes on the dancehall music and therefore have their eyes on the rest of the industry. If more and more artistes can get signed, it will get wider and wider till it get colossal.

Another one is that some of the time we have outside people, particularly people from Europe making offers. I have tons of offers from European people who want to voice me and carry me on tours all over, so one of the good things is that a lot of outside people, whenever they hear an artist like me, they don't judge me based on the amount of airplay or street credibility which is in Jamaica. No, they judge me by the work that I put out, the richness and the quality of the work. That's how I am as big as I am in Europe and those places, because they don't watch the charts here, they don't listen to what is going on here. That's a positive because it makes people outside looking in do not judge us on street credibility and hype. They look beyond it 'cause they look on it from the days of Bob even when we don't see the richness.

(See Kelly's responses to other questions about the music, the country, and other issues tomorrow and later this week.)

----------------------------------





Kelly makes 'madness meal'



By GERMAINE SMITH, Staff Reporter



JUST LIKE HIS performance on the stage, Junior Kelly's kitchen antics were just as lively and rich.

His bite it seems is louder than his bark, as before the cooking day, Kelly quietly stated, without hype, and without conceit, that he had talent around the stove.


Kelly prepared french-fried Cauliflower, with tofu marinated in a special sauce, and pasta soaked in coconut milk. To wash it down, there was a special mixture of pineapple, melon, and paw paw fruits blended together.

Playing chef

Kelly tied his locks under a blue bandana, and wrapped a towel as an apron around his waist. he seemed as if he was going to war, but as he noted, it was all part of playing the chef role.

"The first time mi cook was about age six or seven. Yu know when yu little yu ambitious, mi have the guidance of my mother, but me decide di something on my own," he explained. "Mi put on a pot with some dumpling and leave the pot go play football, and as yu expect the results never pretty."

Now, many pots later, Kelly explained how he prepares his meal, titled in friendly terms as the 'Madness meal.' Nothing was mad about it however, as in just over two hours it was ready.Here is the procedure in summary.

Procedure:

Set to boil in a pot one or two packets of coconut milk mixed with a little water as desired. Add pasta, and allow to cook.

For the tofu, cut them into small strips to personal liking, then season with garlic, onion, pimento, escallion, thyme, pepper etc.

Coat lightly with flour before frying. Fry until they are golden brown.For the cauliflower, cut them into halves, Coat lightly with flour then put to fry until brown.

For the tofu sauce, mix strips of carrot, onions, pepper, tomato, scotch bonnett pepper, sweet pepper, garlic and tomato ketchup.

Add water to this while cooking it under a low fire to desired taste and texture.

When finished add to the tofu and cauliflower.

Junior Kelly's meal served about 10 people, who seemed completely satisfied after eating. Were it not for a strong will, and pressing deadlines, THE STAR team would not budge either.

If we were to grade it on THE STAR scale, he would get a full five stars.

------------------------------------



Aquarius filled with Kelly Fans


By TEINO EVANS, Staff Reporter


Junior Kelly - file

IT WAS AN hour of fanfare inside the Aquarius record shop when THE STAR's Artiste of the Month for April, Junior Kelly, entertained his fans and onlookers by signing autographs, giving out posters, T-shirts (for females only) and chit-chatted with others.

The session which got under way way at about 1:00 p.m., may not have had the fantastic start that was anticipated, as heavy rains pelted Kingston, limiting the movements and actions of persons inside York Plaza in Half-Way Tree.

Little shy

The ladies were a little shy also at first, but with a little prompting from members of the Aquarius staff, they were led inside the record shop where they took a seat beside the artiste.

They were all smiles and blushes, while some managed to maintain a straight face while dictating to Junior Kelly, word for word, what they wanted him to write on the poster and who to sign it to.

For the men, they preferred to hold a serious face, but once they got to talking with Junior Kelly, they couldn't help but realise that this artiste was 'crazy cool'.

For Kelly, it was a 'blessing', to be able to sit and talk with his fans while snapping a few pictures.

Hardcore fans

"It was lovely, my fan base are the hardcore people weh listen mi, a di average Joe, and I love this. It is more up close and personal. The level of appreciation weh dem show fi I, it really nuh get nuh better dan dat. Mi even prefer this more than a stage show," a very satisfied Junior Kelly told THE STAR.

After leaving the Aquarius studio, Junior Kelly zipped off to an interview with a radio station, leaving behind a few 'schoolers', fans and others who had turned out in the wet environs to show their love.

----------------------------

5 Questions with Junior Kelly




STAR's 'Artiste of the Month' Junior Kelly strikes a pose during a day with him recently. - Carlington Wilmot

SEEING JUNIOR KELLY'S wide smile now, one may forget the militant place where he is from.

Back in the early 1990s when he was a young Rastafarian, Kelly recorded the or anti-politics song Go To Hell.

The stance on the track was so hard-edge that it was banned from the radio. Since that time, Kelly has seemingly shied away from pressing such controversial views in his music.

Today, THE STAR asks Kelly how much of this is true.

"Nuff people woulda think seh yes, him a sugar-coat the thing or water down the thing and nuh know seh we have a war still a rage yuh know," he explains.

Time and place

"No a nuh dat. There is a time and place fi everything and we naa force fi be militant or anything. We are militant but the lyrics dem yu no haffi juice it, it's like a honeycomb. When yuh cut off the comb, yuh can see the rich honey a drip offa it. That mean seh yu naa fight the thing fi make it happen, yu see something weh catch yu eye, and it's like something manifest inside a yuh."

"When yuh go pigeon hole yuhself or mek dem typecast you and seh everything you do is a political one, it will defeat the purpose of being an artiste. An artiste supposed to go certain place and draw things fi the woman dem, the Rastas, the baldhead, and fi everybody 'cause everybody, have their songs, that's why they love the artiste."

"I think that as an artiste you are supposed to educate, entertain and inform, mek people enjoy themselves and any day mi realise seh mi caa do that, I need to go back to the drawing board. Mi no waa fi be pigeon-holed or typecast 'cause that is wrong fi an artiste."

-------------------------------





5 Questions with Junior Kelly - Part 3



Junior Kelly


LAST WEEK, JUNIOR Kelly discussed the positives about Jamaica. Today, he speaks about the negatives he sees in the country.

"Right now mi a tell yu the truth, the biggest negative weh a hold we back and is of major concern, both locally and internationally, is violence, the crime rate, the killings. We a run close behind or a run past some place like Iraq, and we not at war. This is a serious issue, cause the movers and shakers weh inna the politics of this country weh we elect and select, we have to do something about it.

"We need fi do something inna our society cause we caan just seh a major concern and leave it at that. People a look pon we and the only thing they can come up with is the crime status. It is not a good thing for any society to be famous for its crime. The approach to politics is wrong in Jamaica and I think we need to change it.

"We have too much fossils and in politics yu have to recruit young blood. Don't taint the blood before it get in the business, if mi a recruit you to take over my post and mi train you just like me, nutten naa go happen.

"Yu caan confine a young youth meditation to your thinking, cause your thinking outdated. Yu need young blood to stimulate the dying politics in Jamaica; we need the youth dem fi brainstorm, hold dem panel discussion and get new ideas fi the budget, the economy and the society. Stop choking the youths.

"We need people who will make the society better and in order fi do that the youths need free thinking fi make the ting better. It naa go get better until the dinosaur dem realise sey we need some fresh youths with new ideas, cause dem have good ideas and them need fi get them out."


-------------------------------



5 Questions with Junior Kelly part 4


Junior Kelly



WITH GREAT POWER comes great responsibility, they say. So today, Junior Kelly states what he would do if he became the country's prime minister tomorrow.

"Yu know seh running a country is not an easy thing to do. I woulda prefer to use the term that if I become one of the 'biggest influential persons' in the society, I would implement certain things in the society.

"Mi waan the readers fi know seh before we can do anything, we need fi get rid of our debt, so that foreign countries can stop dump dem products pon we and tell we seh it can sell cheaper than our home-grown things weh make our farmer them suffer.

Music can pay debts

"The music can pay our debts dem, cause it's a billion dollar industry per annum, if not more. I woulda implement or enforce sound scan. To people weh no know, it keeps a direct check of the amount of records weh sell inna Jamaica.

"Secondly, I would incorporate a locally-based international record company. If I were the PM and I call the head of BET and invite him to discuss business here because we are now the big company, and all the little reggae labels dem who no comply, we put dem out of business.

"They are the ones who are hustling out the music and the artistes dem and the musicians and the people dem inna the country. If the PM call up Mr. BET and say 'let's do business', you will find that reggae get more international, cause everyting come under one umbrella.

Big money in music

"When a man get him cheque it fat so inna the music. How we fi have a multi-billion dollar industry and none a the money don't come back here in Jamaica?

"It's not that our music is not good. They always come up with the politics and say that the videos are not good or something, and we know that our music is so influential on the world scale. Can you imagine if we have a giant company in Jamaica and have the support of all these people in the industry?

"Yu find out seh, we have a company where we can demand things from the world, and make them listen to us. Our artistes then wouldn't have to hope and pray to get signed from a foreign company. They would get signed by our own Jamaican international recording company that is regulated by the government.

More money from the industry that is scattered around the globe will come back to we ... we no have no factory, so we must realise that the biggest industry we have is reggae.

"If we can set up our company weh set up our own satellite and beam our own music into space and into people's homes internationally, that's how we want to do it."


-----------------------------





Five questions with Junior Kelly (P. 5)




Junior Kelly - Carlington Wilmot Photo

AS OUR FEATURED artiste for April, we have learnt much about Junior Kelly's past. Today, Junior Kelly talks about his future.

"Mi waan start write some short scripts, some short stories cause we haffi start with low budget. Mi a no George Lucas and Steven Spielberg, but mi know mi have the ability to write some short script. Even on the local cable, there are so many avenues where mi waan expand mi horizons.

"There are so many sides of me weh people don't see. That's where I want to head in the near future, not in front of the camera, but behind the scenes directing some things, cause all the world is a stage, so Shakespeare seh, and when mi look on all the aspects of our Jamaican life and our society, every day yu see movie.

"It don't have to be a gun show, just look at everyday life. I won't stop performing ever, that's a part of me.

Posted by asid-hi-power at 2:10 PM EDT
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Five questions with Junior Kelly (P. 5)
Mood:  crushed out
Topic: Bling Bling * Floss Files


Five questions with Junior Kelly (P. 5)


Junior Kelly - Carlington Wilmot Photo

AS OUR FEATURED artiste for April, we have learnt much about Junior Kelly's past. Today, Junior Kelly talks about his future.

"Mi waan start write some short scripts, some short stories cause we haffi start with low budget. Mi a no George Lucas and Steven Spielberg, but mi know mi have the ability to write some short script. Even on the local cable, there are so many avenues where mi waan expand mi horizons.

"There are so many sides of me weh people don't see. That's where I want to head in the near future, not in front of the camera, but behind the scenes directing some things, cause all the world is a stage, so Shakespeare seh, and when mi look on all the aspects of our Jamaican life and our society, every day yu see movie.

"It don't have to be a gun show, just look at everyday life. I won't stop performing ever, that's a part of me.

Posted by asid-hi-power at 1:47 PM EDT
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Thursday, 28 April 2005
Deceptive advertising plagues shows
Mood:  down
Topic: Tired of the Politricks
Deceptive advertising plagues showsDeceptive advertising plagues shows


(BEENIE Man & Macka Diamond)


IT HAS BEEN a long-time habit that has been ongoing, where promoters of stage shows and other events seek to prep up the popularity of their events, by advertising artistes who are not billed to appear on the show.

More recently, artistes such as Beenie Man, Bounty Killer, Macka Diamond, General Trees, Captain Barkey and Wickerman, among others, have fallen into the net of artistes who are constantly advertised for shows on which they have no agreement to perform.

Beenie Man, who was advertised to appear on Love Symbol's 50th Anniversary show, apparently had no such agreement to appear at the event. Shocking Vibes, the local record company which manages Beenie Man, issued a release stating that it had no such agreement with Love Symbol.

The release read: "This serves to inform the public that Beenie Man, the artiste born Moses Davis will not be engaging in any Jamaican performances on the 22nd and 23rd of April as he is booked for overseas appearances on those dates."

Major problem

Solid Agency's Sharon Burke, who is responsible for the booking of Bounty Killer and other artistes, says this is an ongoing issue that they have to face, but at the end of the day, even if legal action is taken, it may not resolve the problem.

"We have that problem all the time, but it's the promoters who will have to deal with the patrons, not us. We should sue them, but with our system, we probably wouldn't get anywhere," Burke stated.

Ray Alexander of Khool Booking Agency, which handles bookings for Macka Diamond, another artiste who is plagued with this problem, says it is a regular thing and at times it can reflect negatively on the artistes if patrons are not aware of what is happening.

"The other day when they had a two-day tour in England with Beenie Man, they had Macka's name being advertised on it. All that happened was that the promoters called me and asked for a quote, but they didn't get back to me," Alexander said.

"Even in Jamaica, a nuff show dem put her name on and she knows nothing about it. And when she doesn't turn up, she becomes a no show. I think one of the biggest problems is when artistes themselves put on shows, and when they ask other artistes to pass through, they will say yes, but the artistes don't really know their schedule," he said.

He further said that Macka is being advertised for a show at Fayors in Mandeville for this weekend, and it was only last week that she found out about it. However, Alexander says it will not be possible for Macka to even think about showing, as she was previously booked for a show in Miami.

Alexander says he can't really see a solution to the problem, as he cannot afford to send out a press release every week.

"One of the things that I am doing now is that whenever promoters book Macka for a show, I ask them to do an advertisement with her," so at least persons will be sure that she is actually booked for the event, he said.

One prominent promoter in the business, who refused to have his name published, said most of the times it is the artistes themselves who are to be blamed.

"Mi nah guh even seh nutt'n bout dat, cause mi nuh too worry bout dem. More time man guh straight to di artiste whe a dem fren and dem wi seh yes, but when it come to di management, dem seh dem nuh know nothing bout dat. More time a di artiste themselves fi blame," he said.

Another promoter and popular MC Nuffy agrees that it is an issue that has to be dealt with by both sides. "It is a two-way street, if you seh guest artiste, it's always not a must that they will be there. If a artiste not going to be there, mi nah put him pon di poster, but sometimes the artistes themselves will say put mi pon di poster an is not a must that dem nah guh haffi guh foreign fi a show," he said.

"I'm not a promoter that advertise artiste that don't turn up, me haffi know seh dem a guh deh deh before me advertise them, cause it will reflect badly on you the promoter," he added.

At the end of the day, promoters, artistes and their management team will need to come to some agreement as to how best they can go about getting a commitment that will hold firm, and keep all involved parties happy.

Posted by asid-hi-power at 12:01 AM EDT
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Wednesday, 27 April 2005

Mood:  d'oh
Topic: Tired of the Politricks
The price of 'bad words'



NO MATTER HOW long an entertainer spends on the stage during a particular performance, it is nowhere as much as the time - or the effort - that has gone into making things just right for him or her.

Even before the advertising and entire promotion effort begins, there is the planning stage and, most importantly, the seeking of sponsorship. Then there is preparing the venue, which may or may not include building a stage, putting in the proper light and sound, parking, the backdrop - all those things that many people take for granted, just so that the performer can go and deliver for the (hopefully) eager audience.

Spoiling things

So, when an entertainer goes on stage and contravenes the rules of the promoter and especially the police in his or her performance time, they are using their little portion of the expenditure of time and effort that it has taken for the show to be put on to spoil things for everyone.

And that is what Fantan Mojah did at Western Consciousness last weekend.


Fantan Mojah - file


Charged a paltry $1,000 in the courts, Fantan Mojah will come off looking like a folk hero to the boot-licking masses who see any defiance of any sort to be something to be applauded. How many of those who might cry 'low de deejay' will be thinking of the promoter, who has invested all his time and money and who will have the unenviable task of going to seek support for next year's staging of the show with this image of cursing and bottle throwing fresh in the corporate mind?


I always contend that while there is no such thing as a 'bad wud', but an event that an entertainer has been paid to perform at for a set time, within the limits of the promoter's rules and the rule of law, is not the place to show that you are defiant. That is a matter of simply getting cheap 'respect' from a set of people who are, simply put, very dunce.

No. If an entertainer wants to be defiant of the laws against certain language, go through the process of putting on an event yourself and then curse all you want. Or, better yet, simply stand up in front of a policeman or police station and let the 'claats' rip. Then I would say a person is serious.

But do not take people's hard-earned money and then proceed to make a mockery of their hard work.

Posted by asid-hi-power at 12:01 AM EDT
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Tuesday, 26 April 2005
Patra arrested on fraud charge
Mood:  don't ask
Topic: Women's Wire







DJ Patra arrested on fraud Charges






FEMALE DEEJAY LADY Patra was arrested in Montego Bay recently and slapped with fraud-related charges, THE STAR has learnt.

According to the reports, Patra, whose real name is Dorothy Smith, was arrested by police in Montego Bay following complaints by persons who accuse her of taking money for certain services, which she did not deliver in time.


Broken promises

Sources told THE STAR that the accusations are that over a period of time Patra allegedly collected a portion of money from different entertainers who reportedly wanted to work overseas. Patra reportedly promised them work permits and clearances, but was unable to deliver in time, hence they reported the matter to the police. She was then arrested and charged, but she later received bail.

Police in Montego Bay have confirmed the arrest. A Deputy Superintendent confirmed that she was arrested roughly three weeks ago and that she is currently on bail. He could not, however, immediately state when she will appear in court to answer the charges.

Patra was born in Westmoreland but eventually migrated to Kingston. She got her stage name from the shortened version of the word Cleopatra, and made her name as a talented deejay/singer/actress. Riding on high waves of popularity, Patra signed a record deal with Epic Records back in the early 1990s, and was one of the first hardcore dancehall acts to hit the foreign cable network BET in a time when few Jamaican acts did so. Along with Shabba Ranks, she and Mad Cobra graced foreign television with undiluted dancehall, and became recognisable dancehall faces in the foreign markets.

Patra made her debut album Queen Of The Pack in 1993, and was known for tracks like Bumper, Halla Fi Di Wuk, My Property among others.

Posted by asid-hi-power at 12:01 AM EDT
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Chuck Fender asks 'What's happening?'
Mood:  quizzical
Topic: Jamaica, Jamaica





Chuck Fender asks 'What's happening?'



By GERMAINE SMITH, Staff Reporter


Chuck Fenda - Germaine smith Photo



NEARLY A WEEK after being dropped from his management company Fifth Element Records, more questions than answers surround Chuck Fender's status.

The deejay told THE STAR yesterday that up to now, he has not heard any official word from the Fifth Element label, and he has not heard why he was let go in the first place.


The Fifth Element Label has on its official roster artistes Richie Spice, Anthony Cruz, Spanner Bonner, Jah Penco, and Jah Lions. Fifth Element's CEO, Devon Wheatley, was unavailable for comment up to press time yesterday, but another representative of the management team stated that he was dropped because they could not settle on a management issue.

The representative denied that it was related to a recent incident, where the police arrested on the premises, a man who was wanted by the Spanish Town police. There were questions regarding the man's possible connection to members of the Fifth Element family.

Management issue

The representative declined to be named and refused to state the specific cause, but said it was a management issue.

Chuck Fender did not state the specific cause either, but said that late last week he and the Fifth Element Management team disagreed about an aspect of the management, to the point where their meeting got heated. He added that he subsequently stormed out of the meeting, only to later hear through the media that he was dropped.

"We just inna a meeting bout management and we couldn't settle pon a matter, so because it get heated and we couldn't agree me leave go outside and siddung inna mi car fi cool out little bit. Little later mi a hear seh mi get drop from Fifth Element," he stated.

"Up to now nobody from Fifth Element no call me and seh nutten," Fender added.

Fender said that he was more surprised than anything else about being cut from the label, as he was there from its beginning, and the other artistes on the roster are still friends with him.

"Mi no have nutten bad fi seh bout Fifth Element, but mi deh deh from day one a build it. We do the work and struggle with it from dem time deh cause from the bottom a mi heart mi love Fifth Element, dem teach mi nuff things, but it surprise me, and mi no know what is happening."

"Even today, a mi and Richie Spice and Anthony Cruz a par whole day, so me no know where that come from. Until a man call me and tell me what is going on, mi just haffi go on and do the work," Chuck Fender continued.

Posted by asid-hi-power at 12:01 AM EDT
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